Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology (15e) : 9780205990795

Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology (15e)

Spradley & Mccurdy
 
Edition
 
15
ISBN
 
9780205990795
ISBN 10
 
0205990797
Published
 
10/02/2015
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
432
Format
 
In stock
 
Title type
Book
$147.99
 
 
 
Description

For courses in Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

 

Explore Culture and its Influence on Human Life

Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology seeks to teach students the importance of culture and its influence on human life. By including examples of Western, North American cultures, the text makes cultural understanding and comparison more relatable to student audiences. The inclusion of current information and articles allows students to connect with major anthropological concepts through relevant events.

 

The Fifteenth Edition reflects the changing nature of the discipline of anthropology by shifting its focusing to the more concerning issues of today. Useful features like a glossary of key terms help students understand basic concepts discussed in the readings.. Articles throughout the text touch on all major subfields, including environmental, global, and medical topics, giving students a comprehensive introduction to the field. 


Also available with MyAnthroLab®

MyAnthroLab for Cultural Anthropology courses extends learning online, engaging students and improving results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. And the Writing Space helps educators develop and assess concept mastery and critical thinking through writing, quickly and easily. Please note: this version of MyAnthroLab does not include an eText.

Table of contents

PART I: CULTURE AND ETHNOGRAPHY

1. Ethnography and Culture by James P. Spradley

2. Eating Christmas in the Kalahari by Richard Borshay Lee

3. Fieldwork on Prostitution in the Era of AIDS by Claire E. Sterk

4. Nice Girls Don’t Talk to Rastas by George Gmelch

                                                                          

PART II: LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION

5. Shakespeare in the Bush by Laura Bohannan

6. Manipulating Meaning: The Military Name Game by Sarah Boxer

7. Conversation Style: Talking on the Job by Deborah Tannen                                       

                             

PART III: ECOLOGY AND SUBSISTENCE

8. The Hunters: Scarce Resources in the Kalahari by Richard Borshay Lee

9. Illegal Logging and Frontier Conservation by Nathan Williamson

10. We Are Going Underwater by Susan A. Crate

11. Forest Development the Indian Way by Richard K. Reed

 

PART IV: ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

12. Reciprocity and the Power of Giving by Lee Cronk

13. Poverty at Work: Office Employment and the Crack Alternative by Philippe Bourgois

14. Women in the mine by Jessica Smith Rolston

15. Malawi Versus the World Bank by Sonia Patten

 

PART V: KINSHIP AND FAMILY

16. Mother’s Love: Death Without Weeping by Nancy Scheper-Hughes

17. Family and Kinship in Village India by David W. McCurdy

18. Polyandry: When Brothers Take a Wife by Melvyn C. Goldstein

19. Marriage and Adulthood in West Africa by Susanna Fioratta

 

PART VI: IDENTITY, ROLES AND GROUPS

20. Negotiating Work and Family in America by Dianna Shandy and Karine Moe

21. Becoming Muslim in Europe by Mikaela Rogozen-Soltar

22. Mixed Blood by Jefferson M. Fish

23. Motorcycles, Membership, and Belonging by David W. McCurdy

 

PART VII: LAW AND POLITICS

24. Cross-Cultural Law: The Case of an American Gypsey by Anne Sutherland

25. Law and Order by James P. Spradley and David W. McCurdy

26. Navigating Nigerian Bureaucracies by Elizabeth A. Eames

27. Illegal Economics and the Untold Story of the Amputees by Carolyn Nordstrom

 

PART VIII: RELIGION, MAGIC, AND WORLDVIEW

28. The Worst Lover: Boyfriend Spirits in Senegal by Rachel Mueller

29: Baseball Magic by George Gmelch

30. Run for the Wall: An American Pilgrimage by Jill Dubisch

31. Body Ritual Among the Nacirema by Horace Miner

 

PART IX: GLOBALIZATION

32. How Sushi Went Global by Theodore C. Bestor

33. Village Walks: Tourism and Globalization Among the Tharu of Nepal by Arjun Guneratne and Kate Bjork

34. Nuer Refugees in America by Dianna Shandy

35. Global Women in the New Economy by Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild

 

PART X: USING AND DOING ANTHROPOLOGY

36. Advice for Developers: Peace Corps Problems in Botswana by Hoyt S. Alverson

37. Medical Anthropology: Improving Nutrition in Malawi by Sonia Patten

38. Public Interest in Ethnography: Women’s Prisons and Health Care in California by Rachael Stryker

39. Using Anthropology by David McCurdy

New to this edition

Up-to-Date information relates the topic of cultural anthropology to modern events

  • Seven articles have been added to the text, and five selections have been brought back from previous editions. Four of these articles have been written specifically for the fifteenth edition.
  • REVISED and UPDATED! Eight articles in this edition have been strengthened with new, relevant information.
  • UPDATED! Part 1: Culture and Ethnography has revised and updated definitions and examples throughout. It also includes a revised article by George Gmelch.
  • UPDATED! Part 2: Language and Communication includes new definitions and examples.
  • UPDATED! Part 3: Ecology and Subsistence
    • An article by Susan Crate on climate change in Siberia is included.
    • UPDATED! Richard Reed’s article on forest development has new information.
    • Nathan Williamson’s article on illegal logging has been brought back from previous editions with revised definitions and examples, and now introduces climate change as a new definition.
  • UPDATED! Part 4: Economic Systems
    • An article on technology and gender division of labor in U.S. coal mines is included.
    • REVISED! The introduction includes new examples and definitions.
    • The concept of neoliberalism is introduced with a link drawn between events in Malawi and World Bank interventions.
  • UPDATED! Part 5: Kinship and Family
    • Article on how males and females attain social adulthood in Guinea, West Africa.
    • UPDATED! David McCurdy’s article on family kinship in India has new information.
    • UPDATED! Definitions and examples have been changed throughout.
  • UPDATED! Part 6: Identity, Roles, and Groups
    • An article looks at a Catholic, Spanish woman’s conversion to Islam through marriage in Europe.
    • An article by David McCurdy describes the role of groups in American society, looking at how they function to meet social needs and how they are maintained.
    • UPDATED! Dianna Shandy and Karine Moe’s articles reflect recent trends and the latest economic data about women’s decision regarding work and family.
  • UPDATED! Part 7: Law and Politics
    • An article by Carolyn Nordstrom discusses illegality and the informal economy, linking the local with larger in econo-political processes.
    • UPDATED! Elizabeth Eames’s article on navigating Nigerian bureaucracy based on “who you know” rather than “what you know” has been brought back from previous editions.
    • UPDATED! Law and Order by Spradley and McCurdy has been brought back from previous editions.
  • UPDATED! Part 8: Religion, Magic, and Worldview
    • Original feature by Rachel Mueller discusses the lover spirits in Senegal, describing the relationship between this belief system and Islam and argues for their existence well into the future.
    • UPDATED! George Gmelch’s article Baseball Magic reflects new developments in the field.
    • UPDATED! Definitions and examples have been updated throughout.
  • UPDATED! Part 9: Globalization has been updated to provide new examples. It also introduces and defines the concepts of social and financial remittances and diasporas.
    • UPDATED! Diana Shandy’s article reflects the recent turn towards violence in the newly independent South Sudan.
  • UPDATED! Part 10: Using and Doing Anthropology has been retitled to better reflect the purpose of this section; the introduction has been revised accordingly.
    • UPDATED! Sonia Patten’s work on nutrition and applied medical anthropology has been brought back from previous editions.
    • UPDATED! Rachel Stryker’s chapter on public interest anthropology at work in the study of health services afforded to two women in California prisons has been updated to reflect new developments.
    • UPDATED! David McCurdy’s article on using anthropology has also been updated to reflect new developments in the field, specifically based on the use of anthropology in business settings.
Features & benefits
Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology uses the following features to facilitate learning:

¿

NEW! Up-to-Date information relates the topic of cultural anthropology to modern events

  • NEW! Seven articles have been added to the text, and five selections have been brought back from previous editions. Four of these articles have been written specifically for the fifteenth edition.
  • REVISED and UPDATED! Eight articles in this edition have been strengthened with new, relevant information.
  • UPDATED! Part 1: Culture and Ethnography has revised and updated definitions and examples throughout. It also includes a revised article by George Gmelch.
  • UPDATED! Part 2: Language and Communication includes new definitions and examples.
  • UPDATED! Part 3: Ecology and Subsistence
    • NEW! An article by Susan Crate on climate change in Siberia is included.
    • UPDATED! Richard Reed’s article on forest development has new information.
    • NEW! Nathan Williamson’s article on illegal logging has been brought back from previous editions with revised definitions and examples, and now introduces climate change as a new definition.
  • UPDATED! Part 4: Economic Systems
    • NEW! An article on technology and gender division of labor in U.S. coal mines is included.
    • REVISED! The introduction includes new examples and definitions.
    • NEW! The concept of neoliberalism is introduced with a link drawn between events in Malawi and World Bank interventions.
  • UPDATED! Part 5: Kinship and Family
    • NEW! Article on how males and females attain social adulthood in Guinea, West Africa.
    • UPDATED! David McCurdy’s article on family kinship in India has new information.
    • UPDATED! Definitions and examples have been changed throughout.
  • UPDATED! Part 6: Identity, Roles, and Groups
    • NEW! An article looks at a Catholic, Spanish woman’s conversion to Islam through marriage in Europe.
    • NEW! An article by David McCurdy describes the role of groups in American society, looking at how they function to meet social needs and how they are maintained.
    • UPDATED! Dianna Shandy and Karine Moe’s articles reflect recent trends and the latest economic data about women’s decision regarding work and family.
  • UPDATED! Part 7: Law and Politics
    • NEW! An article by Carolyn Nordstrom discusses illegality and the informal economy, linking the local with larger in econo-political processes.
    • UPDATED! Elizabeth Eames’s article on navigating Nigerian bureaucracy based on “who you know” rather than “what you know” has been brought back from previous editions.
    • UPDATED! Law and Order by Spradley and McCurdy has been brought back from previous editions.
  • UPDATED! Part 8: Religion, Magic, and Worldview
    • NEW! Original feature by Rachel Mueller discusses the lover spirits in Senegal, describing the relationship between this belief system and Islam and argues for their existence well into the future.
    • UPDATED! George Gmelch’s article Baseball Magic reflects new developments in the field.
    • UPDATED! Definitions and examples have been updated throughout.
  • UPDATED! Part 9: Globalization has been updated to provide new examples. It also introduces and defines the concepts of social and financial remittances and diasporas.
    • UPDATED! Diana Shandy’s article reflects the recent turn towards violence in the newly independent South Sudan.
  • UPDATED! Part 10: Using and Doing Anthropology has been retitled to better reflect the purpose of this section; the introduction has been revised accordingly.
    • UPDATED! Sonia Patten’s work on nutrition and applied medical anthropology has been brought back from previous editions.
    • UPDATED! Rachel Stryker’s chapter on public interest anthropology at work in the study of health services afforded to two women in California prisons has been updated to reflect new developments.
    • UPDATED! David McCurdy’s article on using anthropology has also been updated to reflect new developments in the field, specifically based on the use of anthropology in business settings.

Student Aids help readers digest major concepts throughout the text

  • Key Terms are listed at the end of the introduction to each part, allowing students to familiarize themselves with terminology before delving into the text.
  • Review Questions at the end of each article give students a chance to test their understanding of the article’s main themes and concepts.
  • Maps help students locate the societies discussed in the book, lending geographical context to the information presented.
  • Glossary at the end of the book allows students to review topics they might not understand.

Also available¿with MyAnthroLab®

MyAnthroLab for Cultural Anthropology courses extends learning online, engaging students and improving results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyAnthroLab does not include an eText.

¿

MyAnthroLibrary provides an easy way for students to access primary source materials. And, it allows you to be more flexible in your course. Covering a wide range of anthropological topics, MyAnthroLibrary offers a variety of full-length ethnographies and more than 200 case studies and articles — all in one, convenient place.

¿

Core Videos in Anthropology provide students with a closer look into the world of anthropological research, areas of study, and key topics that define the discipline. This collection of two- to four-minute videos will help students put the field in context, making the study of anthropology more meaningful and engaging.

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Writing Space provides everything you need to foster better writing, all in one place. It's a single place to create, track, and grade writing assignments, provide writing resources, and exchange meaningful, personalized feedback with students, quickly and easily. And thanks to integration with Turnitin®, Writing Space can check students’ work for improper citation or plagiarism.

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Learning Management System (LMS) Integration lets instructors link any LMS platform to MyLab. Access MyLab assignments, rosters and resources, and synchronize MyLab grades with your LMS gradebook. For students, new direct, single sign-on provides access to all the personalized learning MyLab resources that make studying more efficient and effective.

Author biography

David W. McCurdy has been a professor of Anthropology at Macalester since 1966, acting as chair of the department for extended periods since 1969. He was the first recipient of the American Anthropological Association/ Mayfield Award for Undergraduate Teaching (1997), and he was the subject of an article in 1977 by Change Magazine for innovative teaching in anthropology. Professor McCurdy received a B.A. from Cornell University in 1957, a Masters in Anthropology from Stanford University in 1959, and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Cornell Univeristy in 1964.

 

He completed a major ethnography (1961-1963), then restudy (1985, 1991, 1994) of a Bhil tribal community in Rajasthan, India. He has also conducted a cross-cultural study of spirit possession (1966-1967). His ethnographic studies have examined corporate managers (1983), stockbrokers (1980), Jehovah witnesses (1973), as well as members of an environment movement (1968-1969). He has also performed continued ethnography (1988-1999) on a national motorcycle association.

 

Dianna Shandy is Professor of Anthropology at Macalester College, where she has been teaching since 1999. She earned a Ph.D. and Masters in Anthropology at Columbia University and a B.S. in Languages and Linguistics with Certificates in African Studies and Russian Area Studies at Georgetown University. Her work spans U.S. and international settings, with broad research and teaching interests in gender, migration, political conflict and violence, and research methods. Specific research projects have explored college-educated women negotiating work and family in the United States, African asylum seekers in Ireland, and the Nuer (South Sudanese) diaspora.

 

James Spradley was a professor of Anthropology at Macalester College from 1962 until his passing in 1982. He was a prolific author who wrote or edited 20 books in 12 years. He made especially notable contributions to the literature on ethnography and qualitative research.