Policing (2e) : 9780133587586

Policing (2e)

Worrall & Schmalleger
 
Edition
 
2
ISBN
 
9780133587586
ISBN 10
 
0133587584
Published
 
31/12/2014
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
288
Format
 
Out of stock
 
Title type
Book
$173.99
 
 
 
Description

For courses in Introduction to Policing

 

Policing provides an affordable, thought-provoking look at the criminal justice system that uses clear writing and eye-catching visuals to get your students straight to the important concepts. By focusing on these core concepts, students will gain true understanding of the material, without becoming overwhelmed with unnecessary information. The book's conversation-starting pedagogy encourages active participation in learning, moving students beyond memorisation by engaging them in the latest research findings and current events shaping the field.

 

Table of contents
  • Part 1 - Foundations
  • 1. Origins and Evolution of American Policing
  • 2. Policing in the American Context
  • 3. Law Enforcement Agencies and Their Organization
  • Part 2 - A Career in Policing
  • 4. Becoming a Cop
  • 5. Police Subculture
  • 6. Police Discretion and Behavior
  • Part 3 - On the Job
  • 7. Core Police Functions
  • 8. Community Policing and Community Involvement
  • 9. Policing in the Modern Era
  • Part 4 - Legal Issues
  • 10. Policing and the Law
  • 11. Civil Liability and Accountability
  • Part 5 - Challenges
  • 12. Deviance, Ethics, and Professionalism
  • 13. The Use of Force
New to this edition

Criminal Procedure provides a brief, affordable, visual introduction to the field

  • Provide the most current coverage possible. All chapters in the text reflect the most cutting-edge research in the field, including the latest statistics and the most current cases available at the time of publication. Extensively revised and updated, this new Second edition includes the latest research, statistics, and court cases available.

 

Encourage active participation through critical-thinking features and learning tools

  • Newsworthy and hot topics on policing are presented in the new chapter-opening stories, including: Evidence-based policing and police science (Chapter 1); economic retrenchment and its impact on local police (Chapter 2); the effects of policing on crime and crime rates (Chapter 3); police subculture (Chapter 5); policing in an age of austerity (Chapter 7); policing policies meant to revitalize downtown municipal areas (Chapter 8); police use of the Internet to develop intelligence on potential shooters (Chapter 10); the lifting of a federal consent decree under which the LAD had been working (Chapter 11); and federal monitoring of local police departments (Chapter 13).
  • Current issues are presented in the new end-of-chapter stories, such as: Texas Border Volunteers (Chapter 1); the NYPD stop and frisk case (Chapter 2); the Sheriff Arpaio pink underwear lawsuit I Arizona (Chapter 3); police drones (Chapter 7); Crimereports.com (Chapter 8); the 2013 Florida v. Harris case involving drug dogs (Chapter 10); the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Herring v. United States (good faith) (Chapter 11); and the Dallas police shooting of a mentally ill man in October 2013 (Chapter 13).

 

Features & benefits

  • Encourage students to go beyond memorisation. Critical-thinking boxes explore applications, conflicts, and ethical issues involving the most current media news.
  • Help students retain the major ideas of the chapter. Each chapter has clearly-identified Learning Outcomes thatare directly tied to course content and are summarised at the end of each chapter. Students can easily locate explanations or find review material for a particular topic. Instructors can link the course learning outcomes to department and university learning outcomes.
  • Promote critical thinking with contemporary examples. Think About It features highlight recent events in criminal justice and pose questions related to chapter content, promoting discussion and application.
  • Show how policing works in the everyday world. Throughout, the book presents the material with a practical emphasis, especially in the chapters and sections on Becoming a Cop and A Career in Policing.
  • Focus students’ learning. Chapter Openers include a quote and a list of objectives. Each objective has an associated icon that appears in the related chapter section and also in the end-of-chapter material, making it easy to locate explanations or find review material for a particular topic.
  • Spark interest and promote critical thinking about chapter concepts. Chapter Introductions present a current event or story related to chapter content followed by a discussion question.
  • NEW! Newsworthy and hot topics on policing are presented in the new chapter-opening stories, including: Evidence-based policing and police science (Chapter 1); economic retrenchment and its impact on local police (Chapter 2); the effects of policing on crime and crime rates (Chapter 3); police subculture (Chapter 5); policing in an age of austerity (Chapter 7); policing policies meant to revitalise downtown municipal areas (Chapter 8); police use of the Internet to develop intelligence on potential shooters (Chapter 10); the lifting of a federal consent decree under which the LAD had been working (Chapter 11); and federal monitoring of local police departments (Chapter 13).
  • Encourage students to apply chapter concepts. Real-life case examples at the end of each chapter pose analytical discussion questions related to chapter content, promoting critical thinking and application of chapter concepts.
  • NEW! Current issues are presented in the new end-of-chapter stories, such as: Texas Border Volunteers (Chapter 1); the NYPD stop and frisk case (Chapter 2); the Sheriff Arpaio pink underwear lawsuit I Arizona (Chapter 3); police drones (Chapter 7); Crimereports.com (Chapter 8); the 2013 Florida v. Harris case involving drug dogs (Chapter 10); the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Herring v. United States (good faith) (Chapter 11); and the Dallas police shooting of a mentally ill man in October 2013 (Chapter 13).
  • Offer students a helpful, easy-to-use, study and review tool. The Chapter Summary Chart displays key information with embedded review questions.
  • Extend learning with chapter-specific resources and links. Media/Interactive Learning Web Links are included at the end of each chapter.
Author biography

John L. Worrall is professor of criminology and program head at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD). A Seattle native, both his M.A. (criminal justice) and Ph.D. (political science) are from Washington State University, where he graduated in 1999. From 1999 to 2006, he was a member of the criminal justice faculty at California State University, San Bernardino. He joined UTD in the fall of 2006.

 

Dr. Worrall has published articles and book chapters on topics ranging from legal issues in policing to crime measurement. He is also the author or coauthor of numerous textbooks, including Introduction to Criminal Justice (with Larry J. Siegel, 15th ed., Cengage, 2016) and Criminal Procedure: From First Contact to Appeal (5th ed., Pearson, 2015); coeditor of The Changing Role of the American Prosecutor (SUNY, 2009); and editor of the journal Police Quarterly.

 

In addition to teaching and writing, Dr. Worrall serves as a consultant, evaluator, and trainer for police departments and prosecutor’s offices across the United States and Canada. In this capacity, he recently teamed up with the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing to author a guide for law enforcement officials on the use of asset forfeiture to combat illegal activity.

 

Dr. Worrall was recently elected to the executive board of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, where he serves in the position of trustee at large (2008–2011). He is also editor of the journal Police Quarterly, the top-rated policing journal, and he serves as associate director for research for the W. W. Caruth, Jr., Dallas Police Institute, a collaborative research and training organization involving the Dallas Police Department, the Com- munities Foundation of Texas, the University of North Texas, and the University of Texas at Dallas.

 

Frank Schmalleger, PhD, holds degrees from the University of Notre Dame and Ohio State University, having earned both a master’s (1970) and a doctorate (1974) in sociology with a special emphasis in criminology from Ohio State University. From 1976 to 1994, he taught criminal justice courses at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. For the last 16 of those years, he chaired the university’s Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice. In 1991, he was awarded the title Distinguished Professor, and the university named him professor emeritus in 2001.

 

As an adjunct professor with Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri, Dr. Schmalleger helped develop the university’s graduate program in security administration and loss prevention. He taught courses in that curriculum for more than a decade. Dr. Schmalleger has also taught in the online graduate program of the New School for Social Research, helping to build the world’s first electronic classrooms in support of distance learning through computer telecommunications. An avid proponent of criminal justice education, he has worked with numerous schools to develop curricula at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

 

Dr. Schmalleger is the author of numerous articles and many books, including the widely used Criminal Justice Today (Prentice Hall, 2015), Criminology Today (Prentice Hall, 2015), Criminal Law Today (Prentice Hall, 2013), and The Definitive Guide to Criminal Justice and Criminology on the World Wide Web (Prentice Hall, 2009).

 

He is also founding editor of the journal Criminal Justice Studies. He has served as editor for the Prentice Hall series Criminal Justice in the Twenty-First Century and as imprint adviser for Greenwood Publishing Group’s criminal justice reference series.

 

Dr. Schmalleger’s philosophy of both teaching and writing can be summed up in these words: “In order to communicate knowledge, we must first catch, then hold, a person’s interest—be it student, colleague, or policymaker. Our writing, our speaking, and our teaching must be relevant to the problems facing people today, and they must in some way help solve those problems.”

Student supplements