Criminology (3e) : 9780133805628

Criminology (3e)

 
Edition
 
3
ISBN
 
9780133805628
ISBN 10
 
013380562X
Published
 
24/12/2014
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
360
Format
 
Out of stock
 
Title type
Book
$193.99
 
 
Title type
 
$60.00
 
 
Description

For courses in Criminology

This text is part of the Justice Series

 

Criminology, 3rd Edition provides a thought-provoking look at criminology that uses clear writing and eye-catching visuals to get your students straight to the important concepts. By focusing on these core concepts, students will gain true understanding of the material, without becoming overwhelmed with unnecessary information. With an approach that focuses on social problems versus social responsibility, students will learn to think critically about the causes of crime and see the link between crime theories and crime policies. The book's conversation-starting pedagogy encourages active participation in learning, moving students beyond memorisation by engaging them in the latest research findings and current events shaping the field.

 

Table of contents
  • Part 1. Criminology Explained–The Evil Men (and Women) Do
  • 1. What Is Criminology?? Understanding Crime and Criminals
  • Part 2. Crime Causation–What We Do and Why We Do It
  • 2. Classical and Neoclassical Criminology–Choice and Consequences
  • 3. Early Biological Perspectives on Criminal Behavior–It’s What We Are
  • 4. Biosocial and Other Contemporary Perspectives–Interaction is Key
  • 5. Psychological and Psychiatric Foundations of Criminal Behavior–It’s How We Think
  • 6. Social Structure–It’s How We Live
  • 7. Social Process and Social Development–It’s What We Learn
  • 8. Social Conflict–It’s How We Relate
  • Part 3. The Crime Picture–It’s Not Pretty
  • 9. Crimes against Persons–What We Fear
  • 10. Crimes against Property–It’s What We Lose
  • 11. White-Collar and Organized Crime–Crime as a Job
  • 12. Drug and Sex Crimes–Recreational Offenses
  • Part 4. Crime In the Modern World–Today’s Headlines
  • 13. Technology and Crime–It’s a Double-Edged Sword
  • 14. Globalization and Terrorism–Our Small World
New to this edition

Attract beginning criminology students to the subject matter and make learning easy

  • Unparalleled pedagogical features give students the tools to master key concepts faster and more effectively, while providing support for teachers. Included are:
    • New Who’s to Blame? boxes include a photograph and an important perspective on central issues in the field—responsibility, human choice, and punishment.

Provide the most up-to-date, comprehensive coverage on classic topics and critical new issues

  • The text’s cutting-edge approach covers such topics as research methods, criminology and social policy, biosocial theories, white-collar crime, and terrorism in a format that keeps students interested and learning.
  • The latest developments in the field describe how crime and criminals have changed in ways that few people had previously imagined would occur, and how these changes hold considerable significance for each of us and the nation as a whole.
  • A version of the last edition’s chapter on biological theories now summaries traditional biological theories and allows for a distinction to be made between traditional biological perspectives and new biosocial theories. (Chapter 3)
  • An entirely new chapter on biosocial theories focuses on contemporary biological approaches to explaining criminology and exposes readers to the latest material in the field of biosocial criminology.
  • All statistics on crime, criminal victimization, probation and parole, jail populations, and imprisonment have been updated.
  • New pull quotes appear throughout the text.
  • A new section, How much crime is there?, shows readers that crime is not easy to define or conceptualize. (Chapter 1)
  • Coverage of the dark figure of crimehelps students appreciate that much crime that is committed is neither reported nor discovered. (Chapter 1)
  • New cases add to the interest and accessibility of critical topics.
    • Two new cases provide insight into criminal motivation: TheColton Harris-Moore (The Barefoot Bandit) case, and The Adam Lanza (Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter) case, both in Chapter 1.
    • A new case on Dzhokhar and Tamerian Tsarnaev examines the mindset of lone wolf terrorists. (Chapter 14)
  • A new focus on drug and sex crimes provides insight into the social costs associated, explores the likely causes of such offenses, and looks at the relevant crime control techniques. (A substantially changed Chapter 12)
  • A new discussion of The Big Five personality dimensions rounds out the discussion of psychological perspectives on crime and criminology. (Chapter 5)
Features & benefits

Teach with confidence using a text from the highly regarded Pearson Justice Series

  • The Justice Series features best-selling authors and instructional designers focused on the goal of improving student performance across the CJ curriculum by providing brief, affordable, and visually engaging texts.

Attract beginning criminology students to the subject matter and make learning easy

  • The lavish use of figures, charts, and line art in this text appeal visually to students, while serving the main purpose of helping them explore and understand the concepts that are critical to the field of criminology today.
  • Unparalleled pedagogical features give students the tools to master key concepts faster and more effectively, while providing support for teachers. Included are:
    • NEW! Who’s to Blame? boxes include a photograph and an important perspective on central issues in the field—responsibility, human choice, and punishment.
    • Think About It features
    • Case studies focus on both notorious and commonplace criminal offenders
    • Theory in Perspective boxes provide clear summations of chapter content and relate theories, ideas, and theorists in an easy-to-understand manner.
    • Chapter Summaries link to chapter-opening learning objectives and to top-level headings in each chapter, providing greater understanding, comprehension, and easier organisation of the material.
    • Key Assumption line art details the fundamental principles of each major theoretical area.

Provide straightforward explanations of criminology’s important concepts and most fascinating schools of thought

  • This text uses plain language and common-sense definitions of key terms to make the content readily accessible to introductory students.

Show the principles in action through true-to-life stories of notorious and commonplace criminal offenders

  • Cases in every chapter illustrate the concepts and provide thought-provoking questions to give students opportunities to apply what they’ve learned.

Provide the most up-to-date, comprehensive coverage on classic topics and critical new issues

  • The text’s cutting-edge approach covers such topics as research methods, criminology and social policy, biosocial theories, white-collar crime, and terrorism in a format that keeps students interested and learning.
  • The latest developments in the field describe how crime and criminals have changed in ways that few people had previously imagined would occur, and how these changes hold considerable significance for each of us and the nation as a whole.
  • NEW! A version the last edition’s chapter on biological theories now summaries traditional biological theories and allows for a distinction to be made between traditional biological perspectives and new biosocial theories. (Chapter 3)
  • NEW! An entirely new chapter on biosocial theories focuses on contemporary biological approaches to explaining criminology and exposes readers to the latest material in the field of biosocial criminology.
  • NEW! All statistics on crime, criminal victimisation, probation and parole, jail populations, and imprisonment have been updated.
  • NEW! New pull quotes appear throughout the text.
  •  NEW! A new section, How much crime is there?, shows readers that crime is not easy to define or conceptualise. (Chapter 1)
  • NEW! Coverage of the dark figure of crime helps students appreciate that much crime that is committed is neither reported nor discovered. (Chapter 1)
  • NEW! New cases add to the interest and accessibility of critical topics.
    • NEW! Two new cases provide insight into criminal motivation: TheColton Harris-Moore (The Barefoot Bandit) case, and The Adam Lanza (Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter) case, both in Chapter 1.
    • NEW! A new case on Dzhokhar and Tamerian Tsarnaev examines the mindset of lone wolf terrorists. (Chapter 14)
  • NEW! A new focus on drug and sex crimes provides insight into the social costs associated, explores the likely causes of such offenses, and looks at the relevant crime control techniques. (A substantially changed Chapter 12)
  • NEW! A new discussion of The Big Five personality dimensions rounds out the discussion of psychological perspectives on crime and criminology. (Chapter 5)
Author biography

Frank Schmalleger, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, where he taught criminal justice courses for 20 years and chaired the university’s Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice for 16 of those years. In 1991 the university awarded him the title of Distinguished Professor, and the university named him Professor Emeritus in 2001.

Dr. Schmalleger holds degrees from the University of Notre Dame and Ohio State University, having earned both a master’s (1970) and a doctorate in sociology (1974) with a special emphasis in criminology from Ohio State University.

As an adjunct professor with Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri, Schmalleger helped develop the university’s graduate program in security administration and loss prevention. He taught courses in that curriculum for more than a decade. Schmalleger also taught in the online graduate program of the New School for Social Research, helping to build the world’s first electronic classrooms in support of distance learning through computer telecommunications. An avid Web user, Schmalleger is the creator of a number of award-winning websites, including one that supports this textbook.

Frank Schmalleger is the author of numerous articles and many books, including the widely used Criminal Justice Today (Pearson, 2015), Criminology Today (Pearson, 2015); Criminal Law Today (Pearson, 2014), and The Definitive Guide to Criminal Justice and Criminology on the World Wide Web (Pearson, 2009).

Schmalleger is also founding editor of the journal Criminal Justice Studies. He ┬┐has served as editor for the Pearson series Criminal Justice in the Twenty-First Century and as imprint adviser for Greenwood Publishing Group’s criminal justice reference series.

Schmalleger’s philosophy of both teaching and writing can be summed up in these words: “In order to communicate knowledge, we must first catch, then hold, a person’s interest–be it student, colleague, or policymaker. Our writing, our speaking, and our teaching must be relevant to the problems facing people today, and they must in some way help solve those problems.”

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