Construction Estimating Using Excel (3e) : 9780134405506

Construction Estimating Using Excel (3e)

Peterson
 
Edition
 
3
ISBN
 
9780134405506
ISBN 10
 
0134405501
Published
 
01/01/2017
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
480
Format
 
Out of stock
 
Title type
Book
$255.99
 
 
 
Description

For beginning to intermediate courses in construction estimating in two- and four-year construction management programs.

 

A step-by-step, hands-on introduction to commercial and residential estimating

Construction Estimating with Excel,  introduces readers to the fundamental principles of estimating using drawing sets, real-world exercises, and examples. The book moves step-by-step through the estimating process, discussing the art of estimating, the quantity takeoff, how to put costs to the estimate, and how to finalise the bid. As students progress through the text they are shown how Microsoft Excel can be used to improve the estimating process. Because it introduces spreadsheets as a way of increasing estimating productivity and accuracy, the book can help both beginning and experienced estimators improve their skills.

 

The 3rd Edition gives students a broader understanding of construction estimating with a new chapter discussing the role that estimating plays in different project delivery methods and in the design process and how to use data from RSMeans. To bring the book up to date, the material and equipment costs and labor rates have been updated to reflect current costs, and the discussion of Excel (including the figures) is based on Excel 2016. Additionally, content throughout the book has been updated to align to ACCE and ABET student learning outcomes.

Table of contents
  • PART I INTRODUCTION TO ESTIMATING
  • Chapter 1 THE ART OF ESTIMATING
  • Chapter 2 OVERVIEW OF THE ESTIMATING AND BIDDING PROCESS
  • Chapter 3 INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL
  • PART II THE QUANTITY TAKEOFF
  • Chapter 4 FUNDAMENTALS OF THE QUANTITY TAKEOFF 
  • Chapter 5 CONCRETE
  • Chapter 6 MASONRY
  • Chapter 7 METALS
  • Chapter 8 WOODS, PLASTICS, AND COMPOSITES
  • Chapter 9 THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION
  • Chapter 10 OPENINGS
  • Chapter 11 FINISHES
  • Chapter 12  FIRE SUPPRESSION
  • Chapter 13 PLUMBING
  • Chapter 14 HEATING, VENTILATION, AND AIR-CONDITIONING (HVAC)
  • Chapter 15 ELECTRICAL
  • Chapter 16 EARTHWORK
  • Chapter 17 EXTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS
  • Chapter 18 UTILITIES
  • PART III PUTTING COSTS TO THE ESTIMATE
  • Chapter 19 MATERIAL PRICING
  • Chapter 20 LABOR PRODUCTIVITY AND HOURS
  • Chapter 21 LABOR RATES
  • Chapter 22 EQUIPMENT COSTS
  • Chapter 23 CREW RATES
  • Chapter 24 SUBCONTRACT PRICING
  • Chapter 25 MARKUPS
  • Chapter 26 PRICING EXTENSIONS
  • Chapter 27 AVOIDING ERRORS IN ESTIMATES
  • PART IV FINALIZING THE BID
  • Chapter 28 SUBMITTING THE BID
  • Chapter 29 PROJECT BUYOUT
  • Chapter 30 THE ESTIMATE AS THE BASIS OF THE SCHEDULE
  • Chapter 31 ETHICS
  • PART V ADVANCED ESTIMATING
  • Chapter 32 CONVERTING EXISTING FORMS
  • Chapter 33 CREATING NEW FORMS
  • Chapter 34 Other Estimating methods
  • Appendix A REVIEW OF ESTIMATING MATH
  • Appendix B SAMPLE JOB COST CODES
  • Appendix C SAMPLE LABOR PRODUCTIVITY RATES
  • Appendix D SAMPLE EQUIPMENT COSTS
  • Appendix E MODEL SCOPES OF WORK
  • Appendix F GLOSSARY
  • Appendix G INDEX OF DRAWING SETS
New to this edition
  • Shows how to use Microsoft Excel as an estimating tool to improve one’s quality and accuracy.

    • Bases thediscussion of Excel (including the figures) on Excel 2016 to keep students current with the latest software.

  • Makes it easier for instructors to measure outcomes with updated content that aligns to ACCE and ABET student learning outcomes

    • Lists the common outcomes found in the accreditation standards that cover estimating and what problems/material from the chapters can be used to measure proficiency of each of the outcomes (See the updated Instructor’s Manual and chapters 2, 5-19, 21-26, 28 and 29).

  • Provides quick and convenient references for students.

    • Includes sample equipment costs that students can reference for use in their estimates (Appendix D).

  • Offers example problems and exercises designed to help beginning estimators apply the information and techniques presented in the book.

    • Expands the problem sets for estimating labor and equipment costs (Chapters 21 and 22).

  • Expands the coverage of estimating to design-build and construction manager general contractor projects, which make up about 50% of commercial construction market

    • Discusses the role estimating plays in the different project delivery methods and the role estimating plays in the design process in a new chapter. This chapter also covers the project-comparison, square-foot, and assembly estimating methods (Chapter 34).

  • Gives students experience using data from RSMeans, one of the largest publisher of construction cost data.

    • Uses data from RSMeans (along with six sample pages from their books) throughout this edition (Figures 20-1, 34-1, 34-2, 34-3, 34-4, and 34-5).

  • Refreshes content to reflect current practices and realities.

  • Reflects current costs with updated material and equipment costs and labor rates (Chapters 19, 21-23, and 26).

Features & benefits
  • Teaches basic estimating principles, step-by-step, in a way that can apply to a variety of building materials.

    • Moves beyond many books to not only talk about takeoff (and the costs of a limited number of building materials), but also the principles behind these calculations.

    • Gives readers a strong foundation so they can transfer basic estimating principles to any building material.

    • Includes a running case study that shows students the complete process of creating an estimate for a residential garage.

  • Shows how to use Microsoft Excel as an estimating tool to improve one’s quality and accuracy.

    • Provides an introduction to the basic operation of Excel and discusses how it can be used to improve the estimating process.

    • Includes Excel Quick Tips that demonstrate how to set up Excel worksheets for different types of estimating problems, 44 sample spreadsheets, 12 homework problems that require the reader to modify the sample spreadsheet, and a final complex spreadsheet that the student prepares for a bid.

  • UPDATED: Bases thediscussion of Excel (including the figures) on Excel 2016 to keep students current with the latest software.

  • UPDATED: Makes it easier for instructors to measure outcomes with updated content that aligns to ACCE and ABET student learning outcomes

    • Lists the common outcomes found in the accreditation standards that cover estimating and what problems/material from the chapters can be used to measure proficiency of each of the outcomes (See the updated Instructor’s Manual and chapters 2, 5-19, 21-26, 28 and 29).

  • Divides the discussion of quantity takeoff is into five groups–counted items, linear components, sheet and roll goods, volumetric goods, and quantity-from-quantity goods.

    • Allows students to learn to estimate materials that are not covered by the book by determining which group they best fit into and using the estimating principals for that group.

  • Includes two drawing sets as a means for additional practice in preparing a complete estimate from beginning to end.

    • Offers a variety of projects (a residence and a retail building) where readers can practice estimating skills in a realistic environment.

  • Provides quick and convenient references for students.

    • Includes fundamental mathematical concepts necessary in estimating for those students who may need a review of estimating math (Appendix A).

  • NEW: Includes sample equipment costs that students can reference for use in their estimates (Appendix D).

  • Offers example problems and exercises designed to help beginning estimators apply the information and techniques presented in the book.

    • Gives the reader a variety of opportunities to practice principles learned in the text.

  • UPDATED: Expands the problem sets for estimating labor and equipment costs (Chapters 21 and 22).

  • UPDATED: Expands the coverage of estimating to design-build and construction manager general contractor projects, which make up about 50% of commercial construction market

    • Discusses the role estimating plays in the different project delivery methods and the role estimating plays in the design process in a new chapter. This chapter also covers the project-comparison, square-foot, and assembly estimating methods (Chapter 34).

  • NEW: Gives students experience using data from RSMeans, one of the largest publisher of construction cost data.

    • Uses data from RSMeans (along with six sample pages from their books) throughout this edition (Figures 20-1, 34-1, 34-2, 34-3, 34-4, and 34-5).

  • UPDATED: Refreshes content to reflect current practices and realities.

    • Reflects current costs with updated material and equipment costs and labor rates (Chapters 19, 21-23, and 26).

    • Gives the student a better understanding of the laws governing employee compensation and overtime with a new discussion of the Fair Labor Standards Act (Chapter 21).

    • Covers the pay rates for employees on projects funded by the federal government with a new discussion of the Davis-Bacon Act (Chapter 21).

Author biography

Steven J. Peterson is a professor of construction management at Weber State University, where he joined the faculty in 2000. Steven received an MBA and a BS in engineering from the University of Utah. He is a licensed professional engineer and a member of the Design-Build Institute of America.

 

Steve’s area of expertise is the business side of running a construction company and managing construction projects. He is the author of Pearson’s Pocket Guide to Construction Management (Pearson 2012) and two textbooks, Construction Accounting and Financial Management (Pearson 2013) and Construction Estimating Using Excel (Pearson 2017). He is the coauthor of a third textbook, Estimating in Building Construction (Pearson 2015).

 

In 2011, Steven was named Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) Region 6 Outstanding Educator. This was one of three awards given from regions around the country. The award recognizes someone who contributes to construction education, excels in teaching, and is dedicated to the construction profession.

 

Before coming to Weber State, Steven spent 15 years working in the construction industry. He has worked on the design and construction of hazardous/radioactive waste landfills, numerous multi-family projects, and other commercial construction.