Paramedic and Emergency Pharmacology Guidelines (Pearson Original Edition) : 9781486006205

Paramedic and Emergency Pharmacology Guidelines (Pearson Original Edition)

Caffey, Matthew
 
Edition
 
1
ISBN
 
9781486006205
ISBN 10
 
1486006205
Published
 
20/12/2012
Published by
 
Pearson Custom Books
Pages
 
106
Format
 
In stock
 
Title type
Book
$36.99
 
 
 
Description

This Pearson Original edition is published specifically for Charles Sturt University.

Emergency medicine pharmacology is a very broad topic. From cardiac to obstetrical emergencies, there is a need for a reference guide that can provide the fundamental information necessary for appropriate pharmacologic treatment. These guidelines provide an invaluable resource for students, paramedics and other practicing healthcare professionals by supplying the necessary facts on over ninety different commonly used emergency medications.

This guide provides:

  • An A to Z list of common emergency medications.
  • Single page charts containing the medication’s class, mechanism, simple pharmacokinetics, indications, contraindications, side effects, precautions and facts, common preparations and dosage ranges.
  • Appendixes of regular prescribed medications, trade names, checklists, indications, abbreviations and formulas.
Table of contents
Table of Contents

Page Medication
1. Acetylcysteine
2. Activated charcoal
3. Adenosine
4. Adrenaline
5. Adrenaline dosages
6. Alteplase
7. Amethocaine
8. Amiodarone
9. Aspirin
10. Atropine sulphate
11. Benztropine
12. Benzyl penicillin
13. Calcium
14. Ceftriaxone
15. Clopidogrel
16. Co-phenylcaine
17. Dexamethasone
18. Dextrose 5%
19. Dextrose 10%
20. Dextrose 50%
21. Diazepam
22. Diltiazem
23. Diphenhydramine
24. Dopamine
25. Enoxaparin
26. Ergometrine
27. Fentanyl
28. Fexofenadine
29. Flumazenil
30. Frusemide
31. Glucagon
32. Glucose gel
33. Glycopyrrolate
34. Glyceryl trinitrate
35. GTN dosages
36. Haloperidol
37. Hartmann’s solution
38. Heparin
39. Hydralazine
40. Hydrocortisone
41. Hydroxocobalamin
42. Hypertonic saline
43. Ibuprofen
44. Insulin (regular)
45. Ipratropium bromide
46. Isoprenaline
47. Ketamine
48. Ketorolac
49. Labetalol
50. Lignocaine 1%
51. Lignocaine 2%
52. Loratadine
53. Lorazepam
54. Magnesium sulphate
55. Mannitol
56. Metaraminol
57. Methoxyflurane
58. Methylprednisolone
59. Metoclopramide
60. Metoprolol
61. Midazolam
62. Morphine
63. Naloxone
64. Nifedipine
65. Nitrous oxide
66. Noradrenaline
67. Ondansetron
68. “-oxime”
69. Oxygen
70. Oxytocin
71. Pancuronium
72. Paracetamol
73. Phenytoin
74. Prasugrel
75. Prednisolone
76. Prochlorperazine
77. Promethazine
78. Propofol
79. Protamine sulphate
80. Rocuronium
81. Salbutamol
82. Sodium bicarbonate
83. Sodium chloride 0.9%
84. Suxamethonium
85. Tenecteplase
86. Tetanus toxoid
87. Thiamine
88. Tirofiban
89. Tramadol
90. Tranexamic acid
91. Vasopressin
92. Vecuronium
93. Verapamil
94. Vitamin K

Appendix A: Common prescriptive medications
Appendix B: Common emergency medication trade names
Appendix C: Index of drugs by their emergency indications
Appendix D: Fibrinolytic checklist
Appendix E: Formulas
Appendix F: Common abbreviations
Appendix G: Common paramedic level medications
Notes Section